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Prophase and Metaphase of the Qing Dynasty (1644~1842)

Development of Medical Theories

The theory of warm disease is an essential part of traditional Chinese medical theory.  It is one of the medical treasures gradually developed over years with efforts of many medical specialists struggling against the disease.  The outstanding figures were Wu Youke, Ye Tianshi, Xue Shengbai, Wu Jutong, and Wang Mengying.  The theory of warm disease had its independent characteristic, principle of treatment, and formulas.  Its theory was closely related to the theory of cold-induced diseaseyet it gradually evolved into a theoretical system relatively independent from the theory of that.
Many classic glossographers came forth in this period.  They made every effort to do textual research and annotation, which produced great impact on reorganization of the ancient medical classics.  Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen Ji Zhu (Collective Annotation on Plain Questions of Huangdi's Canon of Medicine) and Huang Di Nei Jing Ling Shu Ji Zhu (Collective Annotation on Spiritual Pivot of Huangdi's Canon of Medicine), compiled by Zhang Zhicong of the Qing Dynasty (1368~1644), were the most influential annotations of Huang Di Nei Jing (Huangdi's Canon of Medicine).  The studies of Shang Han Lun (Treatise on Cold-induced Diseases) also achieved profound and extensive development during this period.  Books on research of Shang Han Lun (Treatise on Cold-induced Diseases) in the prophase and metaphase of the Qing Dynasty (1368~1644) could be counted up to more than one hundred kinds.
There were other important medical works such as Yi Zong Jin Jian (Golden Mirror of Medicine) compiled by Wu Qian, anatomy monograph Yi Lin Gai Cuo (Corrections of the Errors in Medical Works) written by Wang Qinren, Ben Cao Gang Mu Shi Yi (A Supplement to the Compendium of Materia Medica) written by Zhao Xuemin, formula monograph Yi Fang Ji Jie (Collection of Prescriptions with Expositions) written by Wang Ang, etc.

Development of Various Clinical Fields

There were many new developments in various clinical fields in the Qing Dynasty (1368~1644).  In the prophase and metaphase of the Qing Dynasty (1368~1644), medical specialists acquired prominent progress in medical theories and study of miscellaneous diseases.  More publications dealt with these topics.  In this period, Wang Qingren, an outstanding practitioner acquired obvious effect in treating syndromes of blood stasis.  He raised the theory of invigorating qi to activate blood.
Development of obstetrics and gynecology in the Qing Dynasty (1368~1644) manifested itself mainly in the accumulation of profuse clinical experience.  There came forth many outstanding monographs in this field.  One of the most influential works is Fu Qing Zhu Nü Ke (Fu Qingzhu's Obstetrics and Gynecology), written by Fu Shan.  Other clinical fields also acquired great progress, including pediatrics, external medicine, and acupuncture.
 
 

Wang Qingren

 

 


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